Willow Williams – Activism

“Our Pride is very family oriented.”

The first time when I walked out and picked up the paper and saw our pictures on the front page, that was a little, “Oh, my God!” Because it was just like, “Oh. Wow.” I felt very exposed. But, then, you know, nothing happened. Nobody ever gave us a hard time. Nobody’s ever said anything to us.

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When straight people think they can make money off of gay people being visible, they’ll support it.

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I was vice president [of the INBA] last year and the president this year. [I] run the committee meetings and run the lunch. Well, host the lunch is really more what I do. That’s all I do. [It’s] very volunteer. Very small board right at the moment. INBA is kind of reinventing itself, or re-committing to where it wants to go. I think what INBA is going to end up being is more a chamber of commerce kind of organization. With the Vision Committee and everything, it kind of got a little community-oriented for a while; now it’s more focusing on being a business organization.

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I remember when I was driving around, I’d see gay stickers on cars and it’d be just like, “Oh! There’s one. Oh! There’s one.”

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It’s not okay for a town this size to expect Bridget [Potter] and two half people to put on Pride. That’s unreasonable.

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[The children’s area at Pride is] pretty neat. It’s one of the things that makes Spokane’s Pride unique. One of the things about our Pride is it’s very family oriented. Spokane’s gay community is actually pretty family oriented. I think it’s pretty neat that our Pride reflects that.

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Source: Interview with Maureen Nickerson, 15 August 2007; transcribed by J. Zander; edited by Laura S. Hodgman. Audio file held in the Museum of Arts and Culture.